Jennifer Stackhouse

About Jennifer Stackhouse

Recently Jennifer Stackhouse made the big move from Kurmond in NSW to a Federation house in the little village of Barrington tucked beneath Mt Roland in northwest Tasmania. With high rainfall, rich, red deep soil and a mild climate she reckons she's won the gardening lottery. She's taken on an acre garden that's been lovingly planted and tended for the past 28 years by a pair of keen gardeners so she is discovering a garden full of horticultural treasures. Jennifer is the author of several gardening books including 'Garden', which won a Book Laurel for 2013, as well as ‘The Organic Guide to Edible Gardens’, ‘Planting Techniques’ and ‘My Gardening Year’, which she wrote with her mother Shirley. She was editor of ABC 'Gardening Australia' magazine and now edits the trade journal 'Greenworld' magazine and writes regularly for the Saturday magazine in 'The Mercury'. She is often heard on radio and at garden shows answering garden queries.

Women in horticulture: award-winning Sonja Cameron

Late last month, Sonja Cameron from Cameron’s Nursery at Arcadia in New South Wales accepted the Nursery and Garden Industry NSW and ACT’s Environmental award. Sonja Cameron is no stranger to awards, she wins them consistently for her strong commitment to sustainability and she is happy to share her story with other growers and gardeners. Some 300 plus visitors come to the nursery each year to look at its sustainable infrastructure. Continue reading

Plant dazzling dahlias for a summer of colour

We did a roaring trade in dahlia tubers at our local flower show at Sheffield in Tasmania in October. Club president Paul Robinson arrived with a picture of a burgundy and white Collarette dahlia and a rubbish bin full of damp compost and sprouting dahlia tubers. They were the result of lifting and dividing several clumps from his garden. Continue reading

Tasmania’s Wychwood garden: a new beginning

It’s a scary thing to take on a well-known garden. It is even scarier to open it to the public after a major flood event. That what’s happening at Wychwood, Mole Creek, one of Tasmania’s favourite gardens. Earlier this year Melbourne city gardeners David Doukidis and Matt Bendall bought the property from its creators and long-time owners Peter Cooper and Karen Hall. Continue reading

Hydrangeas offer soothing colours

Hydrangeas provide welcome summer colour in the garden. In my garden that colour extends well into autumn as the flower heads gradually fade from blue and mauve to pink and green. These old-fashioned plants make a splash in the garden but rarely hit the headlines. This year they made international news and also featured in a good news story. Continue reading

Turning your weeds to good use

In late winter and early spring weeds can get the upper hand. These opportunists are quick to get growing to fill the empty spaces left by plants that have been pruned back or died down over winter. They grow fast and flower quickly ensuring they set seed to keep their seed bank in the soil well stocked. Continue reading

Macquarie Island cabbage at Tasmanian Botanic Gardens

I stumbled upon a weird leafy vegetable in the Subantarctic Plant House in the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens (RTBG). On an already chilly day I made my way into the still colder environment of the Subantarctic Plant House for a glimpse of the native vegetation of Macquarie Island. This special growing environment is kept chilled below 15ºC but above freezing and subjected to the gusty wind and mists that would be found on Macquarie Island, 1,550km south east of Hobart. Continue reading

Shortest day brings on blooming marvels

Winter may have just begun, but we’ve already had the shortest day of the year. It’s all up hill from here. The winter solstice fell this year on June 22. The days are gradually getting longer now as the sun rises a little earlier and sets a little later. Mind you, it’s still very dark here in Tassie even at 7.30am. Continue reading

Dogwood attracts puppies

Our yellow-flowered dogwood put on a wonderful flower show that lasted right through Christmas. The flowers have been followed by small, round red fruits – masses of them. The fruit looks like a cross between a cherry and a strawberry. About the size of a small cherry, its bumpy surface resembles a strawberry. Continue reading