Review: Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne Rare Plant Fair 2016

Spring in Melbourne this year has been dramatic and changeable to say the least. This past weekend, despite the erratic and blustery conditions, the passionate plant aficionados were all a twitter as they turned up to the RBG. It was the occasion of the first Botanic and Rare Plant Fair at the RBG (Melbourne). This has been set up as a collaboration between the usually highly anticipated Friends of RBG Plants Sale (normally held twice annually), Diggers Seeds and the RBG. Continue reading

Review: ‘Disobedient Gardens’ by Michael Cooke & Brigid Arnott

I first became aware of Michael Cooke in the 1990s when I was an occasional customer at his plant nursery on Sydney’s northern fringe. Belrose Nursery was, then, one of the last ‘proper’ retail plant businesses that grew and sold exciting and hard to get plants. Gardeners and landscapers would battle the intolerable Sydney traffic just to seek out his interesting range of perennials and other ornamentals. Continue reading

Plant Lovers Fair 2016 – a Very Official Review

We arrived early at the Plant Lovers Fair, mindful that ‘all the good stuff goes in the first ten minutes’, as they say. This was to be my premier visit to this event and I had been very…assertive with my mother and our friend Sharon about the necessity of leaving Sydney early – 7.30am for the 9am gate opening in Kariong was perhaps a little over the top. But we had arrived late to the Collectors’ Plant Fair in April so it seemed VITALLY IMPORTANT that we made it this time! Continue reading

Book Review: ‘1,000 Butterflies’ by Adrian Hoskins

Who doesn’t love seeing a butterfly fluttering through the garden? Adrian Hoskins must because he has spent the last 35 years studying and photographing them in various parts of the world. The study and conservation of butterflies has been a lifelong passion for Hoskins, a passion that began when he was a boy. Hoskins spent many years working voluntarily for Butterfly Conservation in England, as well as leading many butterfly watching tours, and entomological expeditions. Continue reading

Book review: The Bee Friendly Garden

My claim to fame is that I love books, and I have a (novice’s) garden. So this review is coming to you from a beginner gardener, veggie eater, flower lover and book reader who took this book as I take most garden information – an opportunity to learn something that might help me keep my plants happy. And wow, did “The Bee Friendly Garden” help me learn! Continue reading

Book review: RHS Companion to Wildlife Gardening

If I had a shelf of gardening books to choose from, a ‘Companion to Wildlife Gardening’ would not have grabbed my attention. I think of myself as being reasonably knowledgeable on the subject, but I found the book to be a very accessible and enjoyable read and I have happily come away with a list of plants to acquire and changes to make. Continue reading

Review: The Florilegium – Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney

I knew about this book a long time before it was published, having seen some of the beautiful art produced for the Florilegium Society at the Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney. I imagined some sort of coffee-table picture book – nice but something you’d leaf through fairly quickly, just looking at the lovely pictures. I wasn’t expecting something you would have so much enjoyment reading.★★★★½ Continue reading

Review: A tale of two Normandy gardens

A broad lawn sweeps downhill to a lily pond at lowest point, rather than being interrupted by the usual terracing of Continental gardens. On two sides of this lawn, woodland gardens of rhododendrons, herbaceous perennials and bulbs transition from humanised landscape to natural forest. On the far side, a series of themed garden rooms surround the country house and assorted farm buildings, leading to further woodlands beyond. Continue reading

Review: Royal Botanic Garden Sydney – The First 200 Years

I started to read this history of a garden and soon realised that what I was actually reading was a history of so much more – a struggling settlement, a growing city, and a developing nation. More than any building or natural landscape, this Garden holds the layers of Australia’s 200 years of European settlement as well as the lighter footprint of many more years of indigenous occupation. And it is a story well-told, with multiple voices adding colour to this woven tapestry of discovery and loss, exploitation and love, export and import, neglect and care, and loyalty and deceit. ★★★★½

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